Copyright 2019 Benzon Research Inc.

Detailed Species Information
 

Velvetbean caterpillar, Anticarsia gemmatalis

Typical egg substrate:

Egg availability:

Usual larval container:

Also available in:

paper towel

on substrate or surface sterilized and loose

multi-cell tray, 1/cell

8 oz cups, up to second instars (discount)

Hatch time @29C:  ~48 hrs

Larvae are somewhat cannibalistic after second instar and are extremely active.

Our customers have run many successful field trials with artificial infestations. Hatch rate is typically excellent. This colony originated with the USDA in Mississippi.

 

Southwestern corn borer, Diatraea grandiosella

Typical egg substrate:

Egg availability:

Usual larval container:

Also available in:

waxed paper

on substrate

multi-cell tray, 1/cell

8 oz cups, up to second instars (discount)

Hatch time @29C:  ~96 hrs

Larvae are extremely cannibalistic after second instar, especially when confined. As the name suggests, they tend to bore deep within artificial diet, making it difficult to work with later instars. Hatch rate is typically good, especially with fresh eggs.

 

Sugarcane borer, Diatraea saccharalis

Typical egg substrate:

Egg availability:

Usual larval container:

Also available in:

waxed paper

on substrate

multi-cell tray, 1-2/cell

8 oz cups, up to second instars (discount)

Hatch time @29C:  ~120 hrs

Larvae are slow growing, not cannibalistic, and bore deep into artificial diet during growth. Field usage has been quite successful. Hatch in the lab is typically good, especially with fresh eggs. This colony originated with the USDA in Louisiana.

 

European corn borer, Ostrinia nubilalis

Typical egg substrate:

Egg availability:

Usual larval container:

Also available in:

waxed paper

on substrate or loose masses (can be sterilized)

multi-cell tray, 1-2/cell

8 oz cups, up to second instars (discount)

Hatch time @29C:  ~84 hrs

Larvae are not cannibalistic and bore down in artificial diet during growth. ECB grow much faster than the other borers. Egg hatch and larval activity in field use is very good. Hatch in the lab is excellent. This colony originated with the USDA in Iowa.

 

Cabbage looper, Trichoplusia ni

Typical egg substrate:

Egg availability:

Usual larval container:

Also available in:

waxed paper

on substrate or loose (not sterilized)

multi-cell tray, 1-2/cell

8 oz cups, any instar (discount)

Hatch time @29C:  ~48 hrs

Cabbage looper larvae are not cannibalistic unless environmentally stressed. Pupae develop within a silky cocoon. Eggs are somewhat delicate but hatch is typically excellent. This colony originated with the USDA in Mississippi.

 

Soybean looper, Chrysodeixis includens

Typical egg substrate:

Egg availability:

Usual larval container:

Also available in:

cloth sheets

on substrate

multi-cell tray, 1-2/cell

8 oz cups, any instar (discount)

Hatch time @29C:  ~72 hrs

Soybean looper are not cannibalistic unless environmentally stressed. Pupae develop within a silky cocoon. SBL are less robust than most laboratory species, and hatch rate can vary greatly. This colony originated with the University of Georgia.

 

Beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua

Typical egg substrate:

Egg availability:

Usual larval container:

Also available in:

cloth strips

on substrate

multi-cell tray, 1-3/cell

8 oz cups, any instar (discount)

Hatch time @29C:  ~48 hrs

Beet armyworm are not cannibalistic unless environmentally stressed and are relatively small compared to other lep species. BAW eggs are laid in masses, and hatch rate is typically excellent. This colony originated with the USDA in Mississippi.

 

Fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda

Typical egg substrate:

Egg availability:

Usual larval container:

Also available in:

paper towel

on substrate or loose (not sterilized)

multi-cell tray, 1/cell

8 oz cups, up to second instars (discount)

Hatch time @29C:  ~48 hrs

Larvae are extremely aggressive and cannibalistic after second instar. Eggs are laid in masses, and hatch in the lab is typically excellent. Our FAW are used annually in field trials with strong performance. This colony originated with the USDA in Mississippi.

 

Southern armyworm, Spodoptera eridania

Typical egg substrate:

Egg availability:

Usual larval container:

Also available in:

Larvae are not cannibalistic unless environmentally stressed. SAW can be quite difficult to successfully hatch and rear in the lab, significantly more so than other Spodoptera. This colony originated from a laboratory strain at an agricultural research company and has been housed at Benzon Research since 2010.

waxed paper

on substrate or loose (can be sterilized)

multi-cell tray, 1/cell

8 oz cups, up to third instars (discount)

Hatch time @29C:  ~72 hrs

 

Tobacco budworm, Heliothis virescens

Typical egg substrate:

Egg availability:

Usual larval container:

Also available in:

cloth sheets

on substrate or surface sterilized and loose

multi-cell tray, 1/cell

8 oz cups, up to second instars (discount)

Hatch time @29C:  ~48 hrs

Larvae grow very quickly and are extremely cannibalistic after second instar. Hatch rate is typically excellent. They are similar in appearance to H. zea but significantly smaller in most stages. This colony originated with the USDA in Mississippi.

 

Corn earworm, Helicoverpa zea

Typical egg substrate:

Egg availability:

Usual larval container:

Also available in:

cloth sheets

on substrate or surface sterilized and loose

multi-cell tray, 1/cell

8 oz cups, up to second instars (discount)

Hatch time @29C:  ~48 hrs

Larvae are extremely aggressive and cannibalistic after second instar. Hatch rate is typically excellent, and performance in the field or the lab is almost always successful. This is our largest colony, which originated with the USDA in Mississippi.

 

Black cutworm, Agrotis ipsilon

Typical egg substrate:

Egg availability:

Usual larval container:

Also available in:

cloth sheets

on substrate or surface sterilized and loose

multi-cell tray, 1/cell

8 oz cups, up to fourth instars (discount)

Hatch time @29C:  ~72 hrs

Black cutworm are typically soil-dwelling pests, most active at night, and are often immobile in a daytime lab setting. Larvae are not cannibalistic and hatch rate is excellent in the field and lab. This colony originated with the USDA in Mississippi.

 

Codling moth, Cydia pomonella

Typical egg substrate:

Egg availability:

Usual larval container:

Also available in:

waxed paper

on substrate

multi-cell tray, 1/cell

8 oz cups, up to second instars (discount)

Hatch time @29C:  ~96 hrs

Codling moth is a fruit pest, and is quite unique compared to our other species. Larvae are small, slow growing, and not cannibalistic. Hatch rate is typically good, but larvae are quite susceptible to pathogens. The colony originated in Washington.

 

Diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella

Typical egg substrate:

Egg availability:

Usual larval container:

Diamondback moth larvae are very small and delicate, developing very quickly. They are not cannibalistic unless environmentally stressed. Eggs should be surface sterilized for strong performance. This colony originated in a cabbage field outside Geneva, New York in 1988.

foil strips

on substrate

12 oz cup, 100~200 per cup

Hatch time @29C:  ~36 hrs

Benzon Research also maintains what is known in the literature as the "NO-QAGE strain" of B.t.-resistant P. xylostella. It was derived from crossing the susceptible "Geneva" strain with a population of field selected (evolved B.t. resistance) P. xylostella originally collected in Hawaii. The colony typically maintains a level of resistance to our internal Btk standard (various Cry proteins) that is approximately 500-1000x higher than the susceptible colony.

 

Yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti

Egg availability:

Larva availability:

Adult availability:

Shipping containers:

paper towel strips or loose

Mixed sex, any instar (roughly sized)

Female only, male only, or mixed sex (discount)

Larvae ship in gallon bags. Adults in cup cages.

Eggs typically hatch in less than one hour in water that has been thoroughly deoxygenated. Call for advice. Unhatched eggs remain viable for months in cool, humid conditions. This colony was derived from the USDA "Gainesville" strain and has been continuously colonized at Benzon Research since 1994.

NOTE:  The California Department of Public Health requires a permit for importation of Aedes aegypti into California. Please contact us for details.

 

Southern house mosquito, Culex quinquefasciatus

Egg availability:

Larva availability:

Adult availability:

Shipping containers:

None. Eggs cannot survive overnight transit.

Mixed sex, any instar (roughly sized)

Female only, male only, or mixed sex (discount)

Larvae ship in gallon bags. Adults in cup cages.

Young larvae are available weekly for Friday delivery. Pupae do not survive overnight transit and are unavailable. This strain was used for some of the early work on Bacillus sphaericus at Virginia Tech. We have used it extensively for repellency trials and microbial product bioassays.

 

Common malaria mosquito, Anopheles quadrimaculatus

Egg availability:

Larva availability:

Adult availability:

Shipping containers:

wet filter paper

Mixed sex, any instar (roughly sized)

Mixed sex (pupae cannot be accurately sexed)

Larvae ship in gallon bags. Adults in cup cages.

Young larvae are available weekly for Friday delivery. Eggs must be floated onto water immediately upon receipt and typically hatch in 24-36 hours under ideal conditions. Anopheles adults are somewhat fragile but extremely aggressive feeders. This colony was originally sourced from the USDA in Gainesville and has been continuously colonized at Benzon Research since 2011.

 

House fly, Musca domestica

Typical egg substrate:

Egg availability:

Other stages available:

Eggs should be added to appropriate food medium immediately upon receipt. Pupae can be stored at 10ºC for a week or more. A water and sugar source should be continuously available to adults as they emerge or high mortality may result. This strain originated from a colony at North Carolina State University and has been maintained at Benzon Research since 2002.

wet filter paper

on substrate

Pupae (mixed sex) or adults (mixed sex)

 

German cockroach, Blattella germanica

Shipping container:

Adult availability:

Other stages available:

16 oz paper cups with shredded paper filler

Mixed sex or single sex (additional cost)

Mixed sex nymphs, roughly sized. Females with oothecae (call to discuss).

Cockroaches are not shipped with food or water, so please initiate care immediately upon arrival. This strain originated from a major household products company and has been colonized at Benzon Research since 1996. It has no known resistance.

 

Oriental cockroach, Blatta orientalis         

LIMITED AVAILABILITY

Shipping container:

Adult availability:

Other stages available:

16 oz paper cups with shredded paper filler

Mixed sex or single sex (additional cost)

Mixed sex nymphs, roughly sized. Females with oothecae (call to discuss).

Cockroaches are not shipped with food or water, so please initiate care immediately upon arrival. Oriental roaches grow very slowly. This strain originated from a lab colony at an agricultural research company and has no known resistance.

 

American cockroach, P. americana

LIMITED AVAILABILITY

Shipping container:

Adult availability:

Other stages available:

16 oz paper cups with shredded paper filler

Mixed sex or single sex (additional cost)

Mixed sex nymphs, roughly sized. Females with oothecae (call to discuss).

Cockroaches are not shipped with food or water, so please initiate care immediately upon arrival. American roaches grow extremely slowly, and our colony is very small. This strain originated from an educational supply company and has no known resistance.